June 2002
Volume 3, Issue 6
Book Reviews
Adobe Acrobat version

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The following books are older publications, but each has enough good information to be worth a look now.

Sculpting and Making a Toddler Doll Head to Toe, by Susan Dunham, published in 1996 by Hobby House Press, takes the reader through a step-by-step process for constructing a toddler.  Repleat with photos at every stage (the photos are a bit disconcerting, actually, since they are very realistic-looking), the first ten chapters give very detailed instructions for every body part and it's connection with the surrounding parts.

The eleventh chapter might be of interest to everyone, not just doll-makers -- it's entitled "Finishing the Model to a Glass Like Smoothness."

The final chapters are dedicated to weekend projects, instructions for sewing clothing your doll, and the patterns for the body and the clothing.

This book can be found at amazon.com as well as Hobby House Press.

 

Another book concerned with dollmaking, Mimi's New Clays for Dollmaking, by Mimi and Jim Winer, is actually a guide to the "new" clays -- the polymer clays that are to us, of course, old.

Written in 1993 and published by Mimi's Books and Patterns for the Serious Dollmaker, this book is an overview of the makeup of polymer clay -- what it is, how it is constructed, how to use it effectively.

The book is, as Mimi Winer writes, her attempt to "find out exactly what a polymer is and what polymerizaton means" so she would "know better what to expect" from the clay and to gain a "better mastery over the clay."

In her search to discover what a polymer is and how best to use it, Winer teaches us package labeling and safety standards, how polymers are built, what they consist of, what different types of polymer clay there are, when to use which type of polymer clay, how to paint, seal, patch, repair, layer, drill, saw, sand,and carve polymer clay, general techniques, problem solving techniques, dangers of polymer clays, and precautions to keep in mind while working with polymer clay.

Winer also includes advice for creating a workroom, including tips on your work area and the best tools for dollmaking, and offers an extensive bibliography for dollmaking books.

 This book can be purchased by e-mailing Mimi at Mimi's Dollmaker's Paradise.

Editor's Letter | Letters to the Editor | Beginners' Corner | Questions and Answers | Book Reviews | Lentils, Anyone? | Making Butterfly Wings | Treasure Boxes | The Beadpusher Tool | Email Us! | Home

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